The cocktail is an art form that peaked in the middle of the 20th century and has been in rapid decline since. As a young lad, I was schooled in the fine art of cocktailing by my father and grandfathers, I learned many valuable lessons that I plan to pass on. I also want to resurrect some of the old classics that vastly surpass the sugary & fruity concoctions made today with their simplicity, elegance and bold flavors. Most of the time I will focus on one drink, and to provide, at least in my opinion, the definitive recipe, but hope to expand to other related topics as I see fit. Please mix yourself a cocktail, read, drink, and enjoy!

Thursday, June 10, 2010

Buck’s Fizz

To continue on our pre-noon cocktail cruise, we will follow up the granddaddy of all OJ based morning beverages, the screwdriver, with a precursor (or a mere coincidental creation) to the mimosa, another morning classic. We will make sure to hit that in the future, but today our drink of choice is the Buck’s Fizz, not to be confused with the 80's pop group of the same name.

In an effort to prevent a modern flare up of the Hundred Years’ War and keep our Anglophile and Francophile readers happy, we will make a definite distinction between the Buck’s Fizz and the Mimosa; the former being created in 1921 in the Buck’s Club in London, the latter being created in Paris four years later. (I am starting to see a trend in cocktails named for the club in which they originated.) The Buck’s Fizz is distinct in that it has never revealed secret ingredients, which, according to our sources deep in MI6, this recipe reveals.

To make this clandestine cocktail, begin by pouring 2 ounces of freshly squeezed orange juice into a champagne flute. Add a dash of cherry brandy and ¼ ounce of Plymouth gin (this is one of London’s best kept secrets). Stir gently and top with Prosecco (using Champagne only ignites historical tensions).

Buck’s Fizz
2 oz fresh squeezed orange juice
1 dash cherry brandy
¼ oz gin
prosecco
Pour orange juice into a champagne flute. Add brandy and gin. Top with Prosecco and serve, pinky extended.

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